On October 21, 2016, Google Threat Analysis Group discovered a vulnerability in Windows that can be used to bypass the security sandboxing in the Windows32k system through Adobe Flash. On the same day, Google reportedly notified Microsoft and Adobe of the security issues. A vulnerability like this allows hackers to gain access to your system through these security holes.

Today, Google publicly released the information about the security holes citing their terms of service as the reason for the quick disclosure. Microsoft was not very pleased to say the least stating that, “things such as this put users at greater risk.” Additionally, Google stated that they have seen the Windows bug being actively exploited in the wild. In the wild means that they have seen hackers break into Windows system by writing code or applications which take advantage of the bug.

Google has disclosed Windows vulnerabilities in the past, but never one that was being actively exploited at the time. This type of thing is a double edged sword for technology companies, but typically they are not released with such haste. It has been reported that Adobe has patched its software and we suggest that users manually update Adobe Flash on their systems that are running Windows. This will help to protect your system in the meantime while Microsoft attempts to patch the hole.

 

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Posted by Shawn Thornton

My name is Shawn and my professional background is in Project Management and Information Technology. I received my Bachelor of Science in Management and Marketing from the Merrick School of Business at the University of Baltimore. I am currently attending school to prepare me for a Master’s program in Cyber Security. I enjoy anything tech.

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